Renee’s Still Walking Away, 40 Years On* (With corrected lyrics!)**

My mp3 player, which can hold about 1400 tracks, now has three versions of “Walk Away Renee”: The 1966 original by the Left Banke, the epic 1968 version by the Four Tops, and a new, delicately respectful version by Linda Ronstadt and Ann Savoy that is mentioned prominently in every review of their new, Cajun-folk duet album, Adieu False Heart.

A little research shows that I could add versions by Latin jazz percussionist and Cal Tjader sideman Willie Bobo; British protest singer Billy Bragg (he mumbles recollections of lost love while he plays the song almost absent-mindedly on acoustic guitar); and the indie rocker Angie Heaton (who sounds like a female Neil Young from the “Everybody Knows This is Nowhere” era), among about a dozen other covers. I also have a version by Marshall Crenshaw from his live acoustic album, “I’ve Suffered for My Art, Now It’s Your Turn.”

walk-away-renee-cover.jpg

*(Update: A clip of the Left Banke lip-syncing “Walk Away Renee” on the show “Where the Action Is” is at the end of this post.)

Quite a journey for a song written by a 16-year-old lovesick kid; and for that kid’s unrequited teenage crush, Renee Fladen, who also inspired the Left Banke’s other hit, “Pretty Ballerina.” According to this nicely-written piece by rock and roll fan Tom Simon:

Violinist Harry Lookofsky owned a small storefront recording studio in New York City that he called World United Studios. In 1965, he gave a set of keys to his 16-year-old son, Mike Brown [real name: Mike Lookofsky], who helped out by cleaning up and occasionally sitting in as a session pianist. Mike began bringing in his teenage friends who tinkered with drums, guitars, amplifiers, the Steinway piano, and anything else they might find. Except for Mike, who had a background in classical piano, none of them were top musicians. But they could sing, especially one guy named Steve Martin.

By 1966 they started to call themselves the Left Banke. In addition to Mike and Steve, they included Rick Brand on lead guitar, Tom Finn on bass, and drummer George Cameron. Finn brought his girlfriend to the studio one day when the group had assembled for a practice session. She was a 5′ 6″ teenager with platinum blond hair. Mike Brown was infatuated with her the instant he saw her. Her name was Renee Fladen.

The group had begun recording songs, and Harry was particularly impressed with Steve Martin’s voice. Mike wrote a song about Renee. Although there was never anything between the two, Mike was fascinated by her and pictured himself standing at the corner of Hampton and Falmouth Avenues in Brooklyn with Renee, beneath the “One Way” sign. In his fantasy, he was telling her to walk away.

Harry played all the string parts on the Left Banke record Walk Away Renee. With Mike on the harpsichord and Steve Martin’s strong vocal performance, the song was a good one with a different type of sound to it. It came to be known as baroque rock, a style of music that included songs such as the Yardbirds’ For Your Love.

Harry took the song to ten different record companies before Smash Records picked it up. It entered the pop charts in the Fall of 1966 and remained there for ten weeks, peaking at number five. Early the next year the Left Banke followed up with another song written by Mike Brown called Pretty Ballerina, and it reached number fifteen.

(snip)

As for Renee, she moved to Boston with her family shortly after the Left Banke recorded Walk Away Renee, and no one in the group ever saw her again.

Dawn Eden, who is described on Amazon as “a Jewish-born rock journalist turned salty Christian blog queen,” claimed credit on her blog, The Dawn Patrol, for unearthing Renee’s whereabouts, at least as of the time of her posting the information in 2003. Renee Fladen-Kamm is a classical singer and vocal teacher in the Bay Area, who was a member of a medieval English music ensemble, The Sherwood Consort, although does not appear to be a member now. I can find no photo of Renee anywhere on the Internet; not on one of the numerous obsessed Left Banke fan sites, nor on any sites devoted to her own music. Perhaps that’s understandable, and prescient on her part to stay away from cameras. The real-life models for other popular works of art — I’m thinking of Alice Liddell of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland — often wished their genius idolaters had never met them.

As for Michael Brown, nee Michael Lookofsky, he was described on this fanzine as

both brilliant and aware of his talent, but extremely nervous and very difficult to deal with -a clear evidence of this were his attempts to form different groups after The Left Banke, which he kept deserting due to differences with the other members or when he realised he wouldn’t be able to work comfortably. I tried to contact him but it was impossible; he’s currently living with his sister, who sees to it that no one reaches the musician.

I’ve loved “Walk Away Renee” since the first time I heard it 40 years ago on WABC. It came out during an outrageously fertile time for pop music. In the top ten during the same month were memorable hits like the Four Tops’ “Reach Out, I’ll Be There,” the Supremes’ “You Can’t Hurry Love,” the Association’s “Cherish,” Neil Diamond’s “Cherry Cherry,” the Monkees’ “Last Train to Clarksville,” plus some wacky one-hit wonders like “Psychotic Reaction” and “96 Tears.” What made a great pop hit in those days was the purity of emotion, and nothing was more affecting than this minor-key lament:

**(lyrics corrected…by the lyricist!)

AND WHEN I SEE THE SIGN THAT POINTS ONE WAY
THE LOT WE USED TO PASS BY EVERY DAY

JUST WALK AWAY RENEE YOU WONT SEE ME FOLLOW YOU BACK HOME
THE EMPTY SIDEWALKS ON MY BLOCK ARE NOT THE SAME
YOU’RE NOT TO BLAME

FROM DEEP INSIDE THE TEARS THAT I’M FORCED TO CRY
FROM DEEP INSIDE THE PAIN THAT I CHOSE TO HIDE

JUST WALK AWAY RENE YOU WONT SEE ME FOLLOW YOU BACK HOME
NOW AS THE RAIN BEATS DOWN UPON MY WEARY EYES
FOR ME IT CRIES.

YOUR NAME AND MINE INSIDE A HEART UPON A WALL
STILL FINDS THE WAY TO HAUNT ME THOUGH THEY’RE SO SMALL

JUST WALK AWAY RENE YOU WONT SEE ME FOLLOW YOU BACK HOME
NOW AS THE RAIN BEATS DOWN UPON MY WEARY EYES
FOR ME IT CRIES.

As  I write, I have a music-obsessed 16-year-old son of my own. Every chance he gets, he sneaks onto his grandmother’s Mac to compose his own music on Garage Band, and otherwise contents himself with figuring out chords and melodies on a little electric keyboard, and multi-tracking his vocal harmonies on his own disappointingly Windows-based computer. Sometimes he’s inspired by girls, sometimes he’s inspired by the music that inspires him — these days it’s Broadway composers like Stephen Sondheim, but I still hear some Danny Elfman in there too. If he fantasizes about being famous, or writing a song that famous performers will sing 40 years from now, he’s never told me so. He writes music like he does everything else; because he feels like it and can’t stop himself. It’s not a job.

That’s what I imagine Michael Brown was like, too. He just had to write those songs about Renee, and when she was gone from his life, essentially he was done.

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69 thoughts on “Renee’s Still Walking Away, 40 Years On* (With corrected lyrics!)**

  1. Great article… I did notice I have a different version of the words, most notably:

    And when I see the sign that points one way
    The lot we used to pass by everyday…

    …Now as the rain beats down upon my weary eyes
    For me it cries

  2. “Your name and mine inside a heart UPON a wall” is what I hear. The meter requires it.

    Also, it’s a pity that they mangled the subject-verb agreement. “Your name and mine” are two things, so the lyric would logically be “Still FIND a way to haunt me, ‘though they’re so small.”

    That aside, I was 14; she was 13. As Eric Burden mentioned, “She was brown, and I was pretty green, and I learned quite a lot when I was young.”

  3. Rick,

    The lyric as printed in my post is taken–I’ll bet–from a transcription of the Four Tops’ version, because if my memory is correct, that’s how Levi Stubbs sings it. Skipping that beat gives him a chance to be dramatic, like there’s a catch in his voice because he’s so close to breaking down in tears.

    The kids in The Left Banke produced a great hit single; one of those great little moments of sheer artistry by amateurs. But even they would have to agree that hearing this song sung by The Four Tops, with the Funk Brothers and all of Barry Gordy’s production tricks, is a thrill.

  4. just found your site. Buddy I grew up with ended up working with the Left BAnke out of high school (see comments on my web page ww.LaSallejhs17.com) While locating him a few years ago (2003) I also tracked down Renee, since I was 17 and became obsessed with Walk and Ballerina when they came out. They were…haunting. I came to same conclusion – Renee-Fladen-Kamm and I sent the band her new e-mail. I have photo of her at 16 on my web page ….her hairs so brilliant that it hurts my eyes !

  5. Please note that this after 3 22oz Dos Equis amber drafts and no lunch.

    Try to get the the version from the singer on the skinny broad lawyer show….wait; it;s Vonda Shepard! Her version is also quite excellent in her style.

    Don’t know if I’ve heard a bad version of this song. Still baffles me too! 40 years later. Why this song? Must have been at a good point in life.

  6. Good post about an incredible song. Still drawing comments nearly a year later. I have the same 4 versions on my iPod as well. And thanks for posting the picture 1967 — extremely song worthy is right.

  7. Renee Fladen-Kamm has a great reputation in Berkeley for being a gifted voice teacher, musical director, and artist. I would love to hear her recollections of what the song meant to her over her lifetime – I imagine it has been both a blessing and a curse.

  8. Pingback: In Which Everything I Touch Turns To Rhythm « Ladies and Gentlemen We Are Sitting Here Listening to This Recording

  9. I was 2 years behind Renee Fladen at the High School of Music and Art. She was stunningly beautiful-another M&A grad, a photographer named Ken Greenberg, took a lot of photos of her, some of which were in the old magazine “Crawdaddy”. I would love any old Renee photos if anyone has some-I can’t find any new or old ones on the internet.

  10. This wonderfully written and performed song Walk Away Renee is one that has haunted me as well. I can’t say I recall which version of this gem I used to listen to, also on WABC-AM New York City, but I suspect it was the Four Tops cover. I loved the song then… I love it now. I dated a beautiful blonde Renee for a too-short period back in ’88 and of course, the song (which she was too young to remember) haunted me upon our split. I met another Renee a few days ago… the song came right back to me and led me to come to this sight. Wonderful song… wonderful memories. Peace and Love to all

  11. This song has been haunting me for 40 years. But the lyrics in this article, I believe, aren’t quite right. The first stanza goes:

    And when I see the sign that points “one way”
    The light we used to walk by every day….

    (Obviously a reference to a street corner sign and a traffic light, or a “WALK” light, which would make an impression on teens walking home from school. Odd though it may be for a heartbreak song to refer to something as mundane as a traffic sign and light on a familiar street corner, 1966 was a much simpler time and song lyrics tended not to be as “deep”)

    The final stanza is:

    Your name and mine inside a heart upon a wall
    Still finds a way to haunt me, though they’re so small…

    The minor-key, the strings and flute make this song a heart-tugger that probably would not have had as much effect in a Beatles-type three-guitars-and-a-drum-set combo. A violin can evoke sadness like no electric instrument can do.

  12. I agree with you Mike. Renee didn’t ask for this attention, and certainly had no reason to suspect she would be immortalized in a much-loved pop song. And when you think about it, the Renee of the song is the creation of Mike Brown — a fictional icon. The Renee of this earth was the muse, perhaps, but the song is not her.

  13. I think the proper line is “The lot we used to walk by”

    I’ve been to the corner of Falmouth and Hampton in Brooklyn and there is no traffic light very near there (doesnt mean he’s not talking about a light a few blocks away), but there was a vacant lot there until about 10 years ago. I’m thinking that’s what he meant.

  14. I WROTE THE LYRICS.

    AND WHEN I SEE THE SIGN THAT POINTS ONE WAY
    THE LOT WE USED TO PASS BY EVERY DAY

    JUST WALK AWAY RENE YOU WONT SEE ME FOLLOW YOU BACK HOME
    THE EMPTY SIDEWALKS ON MY BLOCK ARE NOT THE SAME
    YOU’RE NOT TO BLAME

    FROM DEEP INSIDE THE TEARS THAT I’M FORCED TO CRY
    FROM DEEP INSIDE THE PAIN THAT I CHOSE TO HIDE

    JUST WALK AWAY RENE YOU WONT SEE ME FOLLOW YOU BACK HOME
    NOW AS THE RAIN BEATS DOWN UPON MY WEARY EYES
    FOR ME IT CRIES.

    YOUR NAME AND MINE INSIDE A HEART UPON A WALL
    STILL FINDS THE WAY TO HAUNT ME THOUGH THEY’RE SO SMALL

    PS: WHEN FRANKIE VALLY RECORDED THE SONG WITH A DISCO BEAT
    I WROTE THIS LINE FOR HIM

    “I GAVE YOU ALL THE LOVE THAT MY HEART COULD
    BUT IT WAS NOT ENOUGH
    I UNDERSTOOD

    • Tony –

      I’ve known Tom Finn since 1967 — a pretty close aquaintence for some of the time. And, so help me God, he never acknowledged your version of how the song was written. First, let me condratulate you and thank you for one of the seminal songs of the century. But, gosh, it’s gob-smacking to have an “insider’s truth” you’vr held onto for four decades exploded. What are you doing now? Do you still get an occasional residual chrck? Keep well. Hope yo meet you sometime.

  15. Cyndi Lauper and Peter Kingsbery made an amazing version of the song on French TV in 1994. I found a mp3 drifting around more than five years ago and it’s been on my mp3-players ever since. Tonight I found it on YouTube. The technical quality is terrible, but that doesn’t matter:

    Another fine version of Renee is the one by Rickie Lee Jones on her EP Girl at Her Volcano.

  16. The street I was writing about is Hull Avenue and 207 Street in The Bronx.
    It was a two way street at one time and when the ONE WAY sign was installed, a little piece of my world changed.
    “still finds the way to haunt me”
    Public School ps56 was on the corner and in the yard there was a hand ball court (a 10 foot cement wall)

    It was there the heart with my initials were written and the heart was there for almost 20 years. (I was 26 when the song was written at my fathers house on Hull Avenue.)
    I never saw or knew Renee. The name was used because the Beatles wrote Michelle so I thought they could use a French name so could I.
    Mike went with the flow.

    • Tony, Thanks for dispelling the myth about Mike writing the song for Renee.
      Hey I’m the guy who was supposed to be her boyfriend. Another myth. We hung out but it wasn’t like she was my girlfriend. People like the story of Mike being lovesick. If he was lovesick, I never saw it. Yeah! He dug her, a lot of people did, she was very pretty. But more Importantly she had dignity, and she really doesn’t like any of this hogwash.
      I can’t blame her, ha ha! Anyway, leave her alone, please. Thanks, Tom Finn – Of The Left Banke.

  17. Anthony: thanks for the correct lyrics to this great song. But let me see if I understand this: you pulled “Renee” out of thin air, and so the song is NOT based on Mike’s feelings about Renee Fladen. Is this correct?

  18. Thanks Anthony, your wrote a hauntingly beautiful song; the world is a better place because of your work.

    I’ll apologize for “Rick” in trying to correct your grammer. “Rick” did not notice that “Your name and mine inside a heart” is an ACT – a single entity. Thus, “Still finds” is grammatically correct.

    Too bad about the “Renee” story – it’s a great legend. I check the photo at “Phil Garrou’s” site. She looks like my girlfriend at 16 (1966), it was a popular look for that time!

    Thanks to John for the great post.

  19. I would love to see the photo but I must not have the correct web addrewss ,would somene post it again…I’ve loved that song since the day I heard it at college..we all have our own renee’s now I wonder if she really existed???

  20. A story at the attached Lasalle JHS link seems to lend credence to the notion that Renee was indeed a real person, and includes her photo, as sent by Freddie Adams, who was in the band.

    http://www.lasallejhs17.com/16.html

    Mr. Sansone’s comments leave me confused and wondering if someone’s perpetuating a little intrigue to a very simple little bit of history…

    Regardless, I’ve also loved the song. Not sure why it’s often labeled together with “Pretty Ballerina”…

    Peace

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  22. Rick’s complaint (about the agreement of ‘finds’) is basically right, but if you wish (and I do, a treasured song) you can still legitimately read the line grammatically as it stands as follows:

    Your name and mine inside a heart upon a wall
    [That heart still] finds a way to haunt me, though [those words are] so small

    Often when people make a mistake (more so in speech), they express what they’re feeling, instead of what their grammar education would lead them to say. When transcribing a feeling to writing, it’s often right to violate apparent grammar to better express the feeling. So on this reading, the image of the heart is what haunts him, which is different than being haunted by the words: the words are just their names, while the heart evokes their bond at the moment it was drawn.

  23. Nice reading about everyone’s take on Renee the person and Renee the song. However it took me 40 years to understand what the song is really about; although it is a typical male anema projection; re: Ruby Tuesday etc. What it’s really saying is Goodbye to youth, now it’s time to be a grown up. Think about it, your first real desire for a woman is the time when childhood walks away
    like Renee. Also it’s a strange coincidence that the initals W. A. R. happened at the peak of the WAR
    in Vietnam.
    Peace & love
    Tom Finn ( The Left Banke)

  24. Thanks immensely to Anthony (Tony?) and Tom from the Left Banke for participating here. You guys are part of this incredible mythology, and hope you get some satisfaction from it.
    I am a forty plus year (small time these days) pro guitarist from the left coast . . . and that song meant a lot to me when it was on the charts, as I was learning guitar and in my first band . . . I learned the tune myself at the time.
    Peace and Love back at ya, Tom, as well as to the rest of band and . . . ever so delicately, to Renee.
    Peace and Serenity to Michael especially . . . . . sometimes acceptance, to play the hand you’re dealt, is not such a bad thing . . . . every day is a new day.

    Namaste

  25. I was in the group and, you should have talked to somebody, because much of your take on the group is incorrect. Most of what you say is rumor.
    As for Renee, she doesn’t want to be bothered by this type of invasion of her privacy, she didn’t ask for it and she doesn’t want it. As far as Michael writing Walk Away Renee for her, his cowriter, Tony Sansone whom you didn’t mention, would beg to differ with this rumored assumption. He has stated that he came up with the name Renee, because of The Beatles using a French female name Michelle. So you see, no one really knows what the group was about, except the group. Oh! And by the way, we all sang very well. Not just Steve. TF

  26. I love this song too.

    BTW, as much as it may sound like a “minor-key lament”, it’s actually written in a major key, and doesn’t even have many minor chords in it. Perhaps significantly, the most notable minor chord in the song is heard during the title lyric.

  27. Love this song. I play the original by the Left Banke and then Rick Price’s version – back and forth all day. Rick Price does a great cover on it. His falsettos are as about as good as they come too. Found it on YouTube. Check it out…

  28. Pingback: 1975. She May Call You Up Tonight – Left Banke (1967) « mijntop2000

  29. In 1968 I got my first tape-recorder and I recorded songs from the radio.
    In Europe only the Four Tops version was known and broadcast,
    so I got this on tape.
    After many years, tape-recorders no longer in use, I forgot this song, but the melody was deep in my mind all the time.
    Radiostations didn’t play it, til last Saturday, an oldieshow played the original of Left Banke!
    I remebered!
    So I’m going to search and, oh what a luck, I found!
    Now I have all reachable versions of this wonderful song!
    Memories come up and many pictures of my past of the last 45 years(!)..
    Great!

  30. Pingback: renee fladen photo | My Best Pics

  31. This song invaded a recent dream as did the only real love of my life. A woman who’s long gone and happily married. There are a few songs that remind me of women I’ve loved but for some reason none hit me as hard as Walk Away Renee. Since that dream I’ve been listening to it constantly. Well, not constantly but certainly consistently. I was 25 years old when I heard it for the first time and it was with her. That was 12 years ago. I suppose the song and the girl come to mind because I find myself once again in the city we had our best and worst memories. It is haunting and I’m not sure if it’s totally healthy to be haunted for too long.

    Thank you for this blog and the responses by the band members. It took me 12 years to realize that the song wasn’t just about mooning over a woman I lost. It took me 12 years to realize that it’s about moving on. I’d say this song comes in right next to The Beatles’ For No One as the most starkly sad and beautiful love songs. Full of sentiment but not sentimental. I’m the one who’s sentimental.;)

  32. Pingback: What I’m Jamming To: June 2, 2011 « Live From Upper Gwynedd.

  33. A thrill to read this after loving the song for decades. Also, uncanny to see original artists participating in the discussion. Interesting that nobody here questions whether or not they’re truly who they say they are. In any event, thanks so much for this forum!

  34. I listened to this great song 9 years before I met Renee. If the song is not really about her then so be it. Just wanted to share that she is a remarkable woman. She mastered the art of singing back in the late 70′s (rare Pavarotti caliber mastering). Her voice is every bit as brilliant and resonant as her hair, still naturally platinum into her 60′s.
    7 degrees of separation; Her voice teacher had a career in Italy during the late 40′s/early 50′s, singing opposite the famous tenors of the time, and later adding Pavarotti and Bobby McFerrin among others, as friends/acquaintancdes.

  35. As posted earlier, several years ago I went to a street corner in Brooklyn and took photos of the street where legend had it that Walk Away Renee took place. Given Tony Sansone’s input, I’ve got to get my camera and self up to Hull Avenue in the Bronx and correct my mistake.

    A cursory glance at Google maps seems to indicate the “wall” he wrote his initials on is no longer there (a handball court in the schoolyard of PS 56).

  36. The song “Walk Away Renee” was a hit in 1966. Written by 16 year old Mike Brown about a girl who was girlfriend to his friend and bass player in their band The Left Banke. The video of the song has been removed by this blogger but can be easily found on YT. Such a great song, covered by so many artists and written by a 16 year old is impressive.

  37. Shocking, really, to read dismissive statements like Renee thinks our adoration is “hogwash” and we’re told “don’t bother her” and the like. Reminds me the beautiful schoolgirls who accentuated their beauty and then scornfully reacted when the boys noticed. Guess I don’t understand what it’s like to be her. Also kinda cruel that she doesn’t care about what it’s like to be one of millions who’ve had our hearts touched watching a starry sky as we listen to by the beauty of this song attributed to her beauty. And yet we’re told to just go away. Not interested in us. Worst case is she realizes we shared the planet at one time and unite with a nod of appreciation for the band, the muse, and the whole event. Or not.

    • I can see a multitude of reasons why a person wouldn’t to be bothered by nutjobs who want to know what it feels like to be a muse. If I were to read Richan’s letter, that would be enough to scare me off, in the first place. Instead of drilling a 60-year-old woman who simply wants to lead her life, try and do something productive, like attending a concert by the re-formed and improved Left Banke.

  38. Sure, Jack, that makes sense on some levels. We all read of actors or performers who exercise the right to be cloistered or avoid the public. For me and my house, gratitude, grace, and thankfulness runs both ways. Even if she (or the band) was completely blindsided by fame– springing from a source external to her skills– what would it hurt to tip her fedora in appreciation that we recognize their/her part? There’s no need to spurn inadvertent fame. More to the point, no need to spurn people– those propelled in their/her direction merely by a thin musical aroma that caught our fancy and gave us great pleasure.

    • I’m sorry, Lee, but read over your letters again. Too much intensity over a pop song from the sixties. All this woman ever did was to be in a relationship with a musician. She didn’t write the lyrics. She didn’t record the song. Sure, the song is the best from the sixties, BUT THE WOMAN HAD VERY LITTLE/NOTHING TO DO WITH IT. As I say, it makes more sense to attend a Left Banke concert.

  39. Stumbled on this page while doing some research on the song!
    Very interesting, in spite of the conflicting information, and the random opinions about Ms. Fladen’s thoughts and feelings.

    The recording I have, by Left Banke, ends the song with CHORUS1, (“you’re not to blame”), not CHORUS2 as shown above.

    This song has found a way to haunt me!
    At both high schools I attended (mid 70′s) I was friends with a couple of Renees. Every time I’d see them around, I’d get the song stuck in my head, and of course occasionally sing the first line of the chorus at them.
    I always felt like they had the power to cause the intense feelings evoked by the song, just by virtue of their name!

    Anyway, just found a cool video of Johnny A. on YouTube, doing his awesome, instrumental take on the song. Check it out!

    -Rick

  40. Loved song too, then as now, though being severely hearing impaired.

    Thanks to computers, lyrics, internet and powerfully BIG HONKIN’ headphones I can now hear and understand the song better. Here is how I interpreted the song on Youtube.

  41. if you google her, she works for an opera group..and her email is right there, i just emailed her to ask her., i even put the “walk away renee ” video , and i asked her if it brings her memories..still awaiting her response. ;)

  42. I love reading this article plus the thread of replies, especially Tom Finn’s, since he was there and can correct any mistakes. It’s cool that in 2012, The Left Banke is touring again, sadly not with Mike Brown or Steve Martin Caro, but with Tom Finn and George Cameron, plus Charly Cazalet and others. They sound fantastic and I hope they stick with it for a while. It’s a kick.

  43. Hi John Stodder,

    Renee’s Still Walking Away.

    I greatly enjoyed your web page on the origins of the song “[Just] Walk away Renee”.
    I write to urge you to add a post script to this page (before the comments since TL:DR is the order of the day) pointing out the (alleged) facts about how this song came to be.

    The (alleged) ANTHONY SANSONE (lyricist for this song) in the comments claims the legend is a myth, i.e. the Renee in the song was just a name pulled out of the air because it fitted in with a then current vibe created by the Beatles hit “Michael” rather than a 16 year old’s crush on an acquaintance of the bass player.

    It is obvious from the comments that this lyric touched many people, sadly not I. For me it is the melody line and the chord structure that make this such a perfect piece. I assume that the music was the work of Mr Mike Brown nee Lookofsky.

    I used the word “alleged” because this is the Internet after all but for me at least his comments have more than just the ring of truth about them. It is great to read those comments from the band members and people who knew/know them (all of which come across as genuine).

    I came to your web site after reading the Wikipedia page on the song. I’d like to do a small edit to that page to give the Anthony Sansone version of the song’s gestation, for that I need a reference and your page would be a good start.

    Best regard.

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